London Review of Rooks: Books about Birds

Keats’ nightingale, Coleridge’s albatross, Flaubert’s parrot, Catullus’s sparrow, Bishop’s sandpiper, Kafka’s owl, Yeats’ wild swans, Poe’s raven, Shelley’s skylark, Plath’s pheasant, Hughes’ crow, Ibsen’s duck, West’s grey falcon, Chekhov’s seagull, Hines’ kestrel - all of them excellent literary birds which do not feature in this list. Instead, we present a mix of ornithology (Birds Britannica), bird psychology (Alex and Me), T.H. White’s masterpiece The Goshawk, and more soaring reads.

The Goshawk

T. H. White, introduction by Marie Winn

Training a hawk is nothing like training a dog – in all its fundamentals it is an act of seduction, and in her introduction to this stunning account of the process, Marie Winn refers to the ...

Birds and People

Mark Cocker, illustrated by David Tipling

From the publisher:

There are 10,500 species of bird worldwide and wherever they occur people marvel at their glorious colours and their beautiful songs. This title describes and maps the entire ...

Collins Bird Guide

Lars Svensson, Killian Mullarney, Dan Zetterstrom and Peter J. Grant

From the publisher:

Following on from its hugely successful launch in 1999, Collins Bird Guide – the ultimate reference book for bird enthusiasts – now enters its second edition.

The Poetry of Birds

Simon Armitage

From the publisher:

Birds are the most obvious wild things we have around us. Some of the best known, and most loved, poems in English are bird poems. This title features poems according to ...

A Kestrel for a Knave

Barry Hines

From the publisher:

Life is tough and cheerless for Billy Casper, a troubled teenager growing up in the small Yorkshire mining town of Barnsley. Treated as a failure at school, and unhappy at ...

Terns

David Cabot and Ian Nisbet

From the publisher:

This New Naturalist volume provides a much-anticipated overview of these fascinating birds – the first book on the natural history of British and Irish terns since 1934.

Aves

Gerry Cambridge

Twenty-two prose poems, each dealing with a single species, document Gerry Cambridge’s lifelong fascination with wild birds. This is from Ardea Cinerea (the grey heron): ‘Old Nog – Henry ...